Category Archives: blog

We are all connected ~ Leah Vong, OTR/L

When we think about the body, we need to consider it as a whole… a connected unit. For example, as far as the pelvis is from the neck and the liver from the shoulder, one can still have a profound affect on the other and on our global movement patterns.

Welcoming Leah to our IPTS team!

Hello everyone, My name is Leah and I am an occupational therapist working with Ed and Elizabeth here at Integrative. My focus as a practitioner is on mind and body, health and wellness. Occupational Therapists or OTs are trained to be able to look at “the whole person” including assessing ones roles, routines, daily activities, […]

Myofascial Trigger Point Class in Bellingham, WA

I have heard from a few people who wanted to take the Myofascial Trigger Point class last January, but had prior plans so……I will be offering the Introduction to the Self Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points class again Saturday, March, 28th at our clinic, 2114 James Street, Bellingham, WA . The time of the class […]

Class update: Introduction to the Self Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points.

1/31/2015 Summary of the first “Introduction the Self Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points” class held January 24th, 2015. It was Thanksgiving 2014 and we are watching the Seahawks demolish the 49 er’s . It was in the euphoria of the win (and a few beers) that I decided I needed to take the plunge and […]

Posture and Pain: How strong is the link?

  Posture and Pain: How strong is the link? When I was in PT school, we had a whole unit dedicated to the evaluation, assessment, and treatment of “postural dysfunctions”. Likely enemies included excessive kyphosis (rounded upper back), leg length difference, muscle imbalances/tightness from side to side, elevated or depressed shoulder girdles, tight psoas, winging […]

Double Crush Syndrome: Why you need to know about it

Sharing some thoughts from an interesting client seen in the clinic last week. What happens when the diagnosis doesn’t fit the clinical picture? For example, the client who presents with lateral elbow pain and is given the diagnosis of “tennis elbow” or technically “lateral epicondylitis”. This would seem plausible except for one reason: this particular […]